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Traditional Reference

Can you help me get started on my topic: direct speech in Beowulf?

Can you help me get started on my topic: direct speech in Beowulf?

 

Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature

Francis

Google books

International Medieval Bibliography

JSTOR

Literature Criticism Online

MLA International Bibliography

Periodicals Archive Online

Project Muse

Academic Search (EBSCO)

Google Scholar

Iter: Gateway to the Middle Ages and Renaissance

ProQuest Periodicals Index Online

Web of Knowledge

 

 

 

Beowulf


There are two concordances of Beowulf: in our collections:

*Bessinger, Jess B. A Concordance to Beowulf. Ed. Smith, Philip H. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1969. PR1585.A2 B4 1) Wells Library - Research Coll. – Stacks

*Cook, Albert S. A Concordance to Beowulf. [Cleveland : Micro Photo, 1976. PR1585.A2 C77 1976 1) Wells Library - Research Coll. - Stacks

*Currently these two are on the table behind the East Tower Reference Desk


There is also:

Vickman, Jeffrey. A Metrical Concordance to Beowulf. [Binghamton] : Published for the Old English Division of the Modern Language Association of America by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, SUNY-Binghamton, 1990. Blmgtn - Herman B Wells Library (B-WELLS) PR1588 .V53 1990

And one that seems potentially very helpful:

Orchard, Andy. A Critical Companion to Beowulf. Rochester, NY: D.S. Brewer, 2003. Blmgtn - Herman B Wells Library (B-WELLS) PR1585 .O73 2003 1) On reserve at: B-WELLS



A search of Onesearch@IU and Google Scholar using: Beowulf and speech or Beowulf and “direct speech” Gives a number of interesting results.

Here are a few of them:


Bammesberger, A. "The Conclusion of Wealhtheows Speech - 'Beowulf', Line 1231." Neuphilologische Mitteilungen 91.2 (1990): 207-08.

---. "A Detail in the Coast-Guard's Speech ('Beowulf', Ll.244-245a)." Neuphilologische Mitteilungen 103.4 (2002): 399-402.

Bammesberger, Alfred. "Hrothgar's Speech Welcoming Beowulf." Notes & Queries 53.3 (2006): 269-72.

Beckerling, P. M. "The Function of Direct Speech in Old English Poetry." (1990).

Bhattacharya, Prodosh. "Hrothgar's 'Sermon' in Beowulf." Journal of the Department of English 22.1-2 (1986): 148-60.

Bjork, Robert E. "Speech as Gift in Beowulf." Speculum.4 (1994): 993.

Conquergood, Dwight. The Anglo-Saxon Boast: A Study in the Archaeology of a Speech Genre. 1978.

Handelman, Anita F. "Wulfgar at the Door: Beowulf, 11. 389b-90a." Neophilologus 72.3 (1988): 475-77.

Jager, Eric. "Speech and the Chest in Old English Poetry: Orality or Pectorality?" Speculum 65 (1990): 845-59.

Kightley, M. R. "Reinterpreting Threats to Face: The Use of Politeness in Beowulf, Ll. 407-472." Neophilologus 93.3 (2009): 511-20.

Kim, S. M. "As I Once Did with Grendel": Boasting and Nostalgia in 'Beowulf'." Modern Philology 103.1 (2005): 4-27.

Lönnroth, Lars. "Hjálmar's Death-Song and the Delivery of Eddic Poetry." Speculum 46.1 (1971): 1-20.

Louviot, Elise. "Transitions from Direct Speech to Narration in Old English Poetry." Neophilologus 97.2 (2013): 383.

McNally, Charles Edward. "'Beowulf Math Elode . . .': Text Linguistics and Speech Acts." Ann Arbor, MI1975. 1476A-76A. Vol. 36.

Nelson, M. "Beowulf's Boast Words." Neophilologus 89.2 (2005): 299-310.

Perelman, Leslie Cooper. "The Conditions, Consequences, and Structure of Direct Discourse in Beowulf: A Study of Speech Acts." 1981. 3101A-01A. Vol. 41.

Richman, Gerald. "Artful Slipping in Old English." Neophilologus 70.2 (1986): 279-91.

Shaw, Brian A. "Speeches in Beowulf: A Structural Study." Chaucer Review 13 (1978): 86-92.

Shippey, T. A. "Principles of Conversation in Beowulfian Speech." Techniques of Description: Spoken and Written Discourse. Eds. Sinclair, John M., Michael Hoey and Gwyneth Fox. London: Routledge, 1993. 109-26.

 


Of the above the full text is available for:

Bammesberger, Alfred. "Hrothgar's Speech Welcoming Beowulf." Notes & Queries 53.3 (2006): 269-72.


Bjork, Robert E. "Speech as Gift in Beowulf." Speculum.4 (1994): 993.

Handelman, Anita F. "Wulfgar at the Door: Beowulf, 11. 389b-90a." Neophilologus 72.3 (1988): 475-77.

Jager, Eric. "Speech and the Chest in Old English Poetry: Orality or Pectorality?" Speculum 65 (1990): 845-59.

Kightley, M. R. "Reinterpreting Threats to Face: The Use of Politeness in Beowulf, Ll. 407-472."  Neophilologus 93.3 (2009): 511-20.

Kim, S. M. ""As I Once Did with Grendel": Boasting and Nostalgia in 'Beowulf'." Modern Philology 103.1 (2005): 4-27.

Lönnroth, Lars. "Hjálmar's Death-Song and the Delivery of Eddic Poetry." Speculum 46.1 (1971): 1-20.

Louviot, Elise. "Transitions from Direct Speech to Narration in Old English Poetry." Neophilologus 97.2 (2013): 383.

Nelson, M. "Beowulf's Boast Words." Neophilologus 89.2 (2005): 299-310.

Richman, Gerald. "Artful Slipping in Old English." Neophilologus 70.2 (1986): 279-91.

Shaw, Brian A. "Speeches in Beowulf: A Structural Study." Chaucer Review 13 (1978): 86-92.
 



From JSTOR ("direct speech" and Beowulf) for example:

Klaeber, Fr. "Observations on the Finn Episode." The Journal of English and Germanic Philology , Vol. 14, No. 4 (Oct., 1915) , pp. 544-549

Databases in the Time of Beowulf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the early 1990s, the Reference Department had five electronic databases: PsycLIT, The MLA bibliography, ERIC, the Humanities Index and the Social Science Index.

At first PscyLIT and ERIC came on floppy disks, run on a dual floppy IBM 8088 workstation. One was a data disk, the other disk held the spill file that sorted the results. Distribution later came on CD-ROM, but still using stand-alone worstations

 


The databases gave only bibliographic information, although sometimes with an abstract and short subject or keyword headings; there was no direct access to full text.

 

 

The IU Bloomington libraries has access to hundreds of databases, from AAPG Datapages to Zoological Record.
Many of the databases contain full text; Our link resolver, IU~Link, can link from bibliographic references to the full text if we have access to it in the electronic collections.
Sophisticated searching is possible with the advanced search options, facets and check boxes available in most databases
OneSearch@IU is our federated search engine.
It makes a good, basic start for subject searches, but some prefer to search the native interfaces of individual databases