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Spotlight on New Electronic Resources at IU Libraries

Lists of newly acquired digital content since 2018 and more information about select resources

About this Guide

Each year, the IU Bloomington Libraries purchase many significant new electronic resources to our collections. It can be difficult to keep track of these new additions. This guide addresses that challenge by highlighting selected new acquisitions and listing others.

The guide does not cover all recent acquisitions, nor does it seek to introduce you to library resources. It is primarily meant for people who are already familiar with the IU Libraries and who want to keep abreast of recent acquisitions. If that is not you, the links below may be of more use to you.

This guide is maintained by subject librarians. Please contact the guide owner, Scott Libson, with questions or comments.

Spotlight

Slave ship manifest with names of enslaved people, aged 2-40

Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Law and Order in 19th Century America, 1636-1880

For many people, past and present, the 1863 photograph of "Whipped Peter" made the brutality of American slavery clear. The image above, a ship's manifest, appears far more pedestrian, a minor historical document produced without the care or consideration reflected in the photograph. One might note that it is in such minor historical documents, when brought together with countless other minor historical documents, that students and scholars change our understanding of history. Indeed, the meticulous details of the slave economy has produced some of the most significant scholarship in recent years, such as Caitlin Rosenthal's Accounting for Slavery: Masters and Management (2018) (print and e-book).

Just in itself, though, this hastily written scrap of paper tells the same horrible yet human story as the scarred back of Gordon (aka "Whipped Peter"). It is the manifest of the sloop General Pulaski. It lists 12 names of people sent from Baltimore to Savannah in 1826. Among them, "William, son of Comfort" [the latter listed a few lines earlier], aged 2, height 2 feet 4 inches. Also Isaac, with no parents listed, aged 5, height 2 feet 10 inches. It indicates, just in its few lines, a half dozen of the countless people who facilitated the enslavement of Black people, from the enslaver in Baltimore to the ship master to the collector to the examiner. There are millions of such scraps, which together underline the centrality of slavery to American history.

The IU Libraries have recently acquired Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Law and Order in 19th Century America, 1636-1880, an archive of primary source materials about American slavery and the legal system that undergirded it from the colonial era until after the Civil War. In addition to ship manifests, it includes correspondence and other papers of attorneys general of the United States, documents of various merchant families in Rhode Island (including the Browns) who prospered as a consequence of American slavery, and the papers of Rice Ballard, a slave trader and later planter, who lived and worked across the southern United States. Contributing repositories include the US National Archives, the Southern Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the Rhode Island Historical Society. Explore this resource (login required).

SPL

[image: "Manifest of Negros, Mulattos, and persons of Color, taken on board the Sloop Genl. Pulaski," 17 April 1826, https://congressional.proquest.com/histvault?q=100538-001-0598&accountid=11620]

More featured databases

PBS Video Collection, Now Updated to 4th Edition

This collection assembles hundreds of documentary films and series from the history of the Public Broadcasting Service into one online interface.

PBS Logo

Soviet Woman Digital Archive

Published initially under the aegis of the of Soviet Women’s Anti-Fascist Committee and the Central Council of Trade Unions of the USSR, in the aftermath of the WWII in 1945, the Soviet Woman magazine began as a bimonthly illustrated magazine tasked with countering anti-Soviet propaganda. The magazine introduced Western audiences to the lifestyle of Soviet women, their role in the post-WWII rebuilding of the Soviet economy, and praised their achievements in the arts and the sciences.

(image: Cover, Soviet Woman (December 1966), link)

Blond-haired white woman with a jacket and a slight smile

Wiley Digital Archives, Now Including Royal Geographical Society Archives

Provides access to historical primary sources, digitized from leading societies, libraries, and archives around the world. All Archives are cross-searchable, and contain tools for searching, browsing, analyzing and visualizing primary source content.

(image: A Map of the British and French Settlements in North America, Royal Geographic Society Archives, 1755, link)

1755 map of North America with shading and erroneous labels

Nursing and Mental Health in Video: a Symptom Media Collection

Access to over 240 videos of the most common mental health disorders nurses may encounter – whether in a primary care setting, emergency room, medical, psychiatric or other.

(image: Alexander Street Press, Nursing and Mental Health in Video brochure, link)

Four people surrounding a blue image of chairs and a closed door

Xiao Bao

Access to more than 400 titles of tabloids published between 1897 to 1949. These popular newspapers covered modern life in late Qing and Republican China, focusing on leisure, entertainment, literature, film, theater and dance and the latest gossip.

(image: Cover, 影剧新闻 (1943), link)

Black and white photo of a woman with a hand under her chin

Summer 2021 A-Z List

New databases:
Expanded access to previously owned databases: