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Philosophy

The IU Bloomington Libraries' Philosophy collection supports research and teaching in all branches of philosophy.

IUCAT Search

IUCAT is the IUB Libraries catalog. Find books, journals, music, and more!


Ways to access IUCAT:  

OneSearch Tutorial

OneSearch is sort of like Google for libraries. It searches within the hundreds of individual databases that IU Libraries subscribes to all at once. It primarily searches for articles.

This video tutorial shows how to access OneSearch and search effectively using filters including the use of the Peer-Review limiter.

OneSearch@IU

OneSearch@IU searches most of Libraries' databases. It is a great place to start your research.

Direct access at: libraries.indiana.edu/resources/onesearch

OneSearch@IU
Limit Your Results

More databases can be found on the Libraries homepage under the "Research" tab or the "Top Recommended Resources" (bottom of the page). 

Keyword Searching: Tips

A keyword expresses a central concept or idea about a topic. When you search Google, you are keyword searching. 

When searching library resources like databases, be more selective with keywords. Begin with a small number of terms, and avoid long phrases.

 

Identifying Keywords

1. Major concepts: Identify major concepts of your topic.

Example topic: the environmental consequences of fracking

2. Related terms: Develop keywords related to the major concepts of your topic.

Example:

Concept 1: Fracking

Concept 2: Environmental consequences

Fracking

Hydraulic fracturing

Natural gas drilling

Environment

Pollution

Global warming

Note: Databases can be picky about search terms. Identify synonyms for your concepts, and consider the words likely used in the database. 

3. Background research: To identify useful keywords, do some quick background research. Note terms that are often used to discuss the topic. 

(Reference sources like Wikipedia or the library databases Encyclopaedia Britannica and Credo Reference offer overviews of many topics. Of course, remember to evaluate information in Wikipedia with particular care.)

4. Database search results: Do a quick database search and view the search results page to identify relevant terms.

  • Titles and article abstracts (summaries) may include helpful terms. 
  • “subject” terms to describe their records. Subject terms can help you locate more records on that topic.  They also give an overview of how others have approached the topic. 

 

Effective Keyword Searching

1. Be concise: Begin with only 2-3 terms, and avoid long phrases. The more terms you enter the fewer results you’ll get.

Keyword Search Examples:  
environmental consequences of fracking
: 0 results
fracking environment: 2,472 results

 

2. Use synonyms and related terms: If your first term doesn’t work, try a synonym. You may have to try out several related search terms to find the types of resources you're looking for.  

(Example: environment INSTEAD OF environmental consequences)

Why use Boolean operators?

Most library databases use Boolean operators (ANDOR, and NOT). 

Use them to narrow or broaden search results.

  • AND for records that include both terms (narrows search)
  • OR for records that include either term (broadens search)
  • NOT to exclude irrelevant concepts (narrows search)

Example: Iran AND China AND (energy OR petroleum OR oil) 

Adapted from SAIS Library, Johns Hopkins Univ. "Database Search Tips" Guide (no longer extant).

Searching the Archives

Many of the collections are searchable through Archives Online. Enter your search term in the box, and choose "University Archives, IU Bloomington" before clicking the search button. Once you select a collection to view, click on "Entire Document" on the left of the screen to view the entire inventory of the collection. 

This is called a "finding aid" because it aids you in finding what you need in the collection. The "Title" of the collection and the "Collection No."are listed in the first portion of the finding aid. The "Collection No." is what you use to request a collection, along with the specific box numbers. Make sure to use the finding aid to help you locate which boxes have materials of interest. Read more on requesting materials below.

Helpful online tutorials that provide more detailed information on searching and accessing our collections are listed below:

How to search in Archives Online

Finding Aid Description