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Art and Gender

A guide to researching topics at the intersection of visual art and gender. Includes tips for researching artists, as well as a list of sample artists working in different media.

Primary vs Secondary Sources

Primary Sources provide direct or first-hand evidence about an event, object, person or work of art.

  • Usually contemporary to the events and people described
  • May be written and non-written
  • Examples include:
    • diaries
    • works of art and literature
    • speeches
    • audio and video recordings
    • photographs and posters
    • newspaper ads and stories
    • laws and legislative hearings
    • plant and animal specimens
    • original research studies

Secondary Sources lack the immediacy of a primary record.

  • Produced sometime after an event happened
  • Contain information that has been interpreted, analyzed or processed
  • Often based on primary sources
  • Examples:
    • history textbooks
    • interpretive journal articles
    • book reviews 

Primary Source Indexes

Online Primary Sources

Primary Sources for Art

Primary Sources for Gender Studies