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HIST J400 Golden Ages in History

Written for Colin P. Elliott's course HIST J-400 Golden Ages in History, Spring 2020

Why Cite?

This page offers tips on how to manage your sources using bibliographic software, and how to cite books and articles in Chicago style.

Citation is the way you locate yourself in the ongoing scholarly conversation. It shows that you are familiar with the conversation that has preceded you and it allows your readers to find the sources that inspired you.

It is a good idea to have a system for keeping track of the sources you find in the course of your research. Bibliographic software (also known as citation managers) make this task a breeze. They not only help organize your research but also generate bibliogaphies when you are writing your own contribution.

Read on for more deatils.

Citation Managers

Citation managers format references in the style you choose (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago).

IU students have free access to several citation managers (i.e., "bibliographic software").

NOTE: Always check the accuracy of citations created through these tools. They can be very helpful, but may make mistakes.


Citation Managers at IU

Chicago Citation Examples

Footnote or Endnote

Books

Known Author:
William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom! (New York: Vintage Books, 1990), 271.
Unknown Author:
Economies of Signs & Space (London: Sage Publications, 1994), 241-51.

Electronic Journals

Known Author:
Henry E. Bent, “Professionalization of the Ph.D. Degree,” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 141, accessed December 5, 2008, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1978286.
Unknown Author:
“Professionalization of the Ph.D. Degree,” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 141, accessed December 5, 2008, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1978286.

Reference List

Electronic Journal Article

Bent, Henry E. "Professionalization of the Ph.D. Degree.” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 0-145. Accessed December 5, 2008. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1978286.

Print Journal

MacDonald, Susan Peck. “The Erasure of Language.” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 585-625.

Book

Danziger, Susan. Slicing up the Pie: Getting a Bigger Half. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

*Examples from the Purdue Owl Chicago Guide